Squire precision bass china cy dating

S/E: The S and E serial number prefix Korean Squiers are from the late 1980s/early 1990s. There were also Korean Squier serials with no serial number prefix and 6 or 7 numbers and the first number is the year.[edit] Chinese & Taiwanese Squiers YN: Y = Yako (Taiwan), N = Nineties (1990s), the first number following the serial number prefix is the year. CY: C = China, Y = Yako (Taiwan), the serial number prefix is followed by a 2 number year. CY serials are usually used on Crafted in China Squiers.

squire precision bass china cy dating-14squire precision bass china cy dating-25squire precision bass china cy dating-55

History Fender, under the ownership of CBS, acquired the Squier brand name in 1965 when it bought a USA based string making firm, but it lay dormant for many years [1].

Before the Fender Squier series were introduced in 1982, Fender were making lower priced guitars such as the Fender Lead series at their Fullerton California plant.

Tokai was seriously considered to start building the first Japanese made Fenders but after a breakdown in negotiations, Fuji Gen Gakki was chosen instead [2].

The first Squier series was launched on July/August 1982 and over time the Squier series has slowly evolved to include original model designs and production has moved from Japan to various other Asian countries such as Korea and China.[edit] Initial Squier JV series The first Fender Japan models introduced in May 1982, were the 19 series which were Fender Stratocaster models ST'57-115, ST'57-85, ST'57-65, ST'62-115, ST'62-85, ST'62-65 and the Precision Bass models PB'57-95, PB'57-70, PB'62-98, PB'62-75.

[edit] USA Squiers Fender did not make many Squiers in the USA.

Some USA made Squiers have a serial number with a E = Eighties (1980s) prefix, and some have a serial number with a N = Nineties (1990s) prefix.

Until the introduction of the Fender Squier series, Fender had never produced lower priced guitars based on their main Stratocaster and Telecaster designs and had always used different model designs for their lower priced guitars.

In the late 1970s and early 1980s Fender was facing competition from lower priced Japanese made guitars.

The lower priced Fender guitars were made in America and could not compete with the lower prices of Japanese made Fender copies.

In the early 1980s, Japanese labor and production costs were much lower than in America and to compete with the Japanese made guitars, Fender moved the lower priced Fender guitar production from America to Japan.

The large Fender logo of the export Squier series was soon changed to a large Squier logo.