annapolisdating com Era dating articles

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Join Britannica's Publishing Partner Program and our community of experts to gain a global audience for your work!

The fauna and flora of the Mesozoic were distinctly different from those of the Paleozoic, the largest mass extinction in Earth history having occurred at the boundary of the two eras, when some 90 percent of all marine invertebrate species and 70 percent of terrestrial vertebrate genera disappeared.At the start of the Mesozoic, the remaining biota began a prolonged recovery of diversity and total population numbers, and ecosystems began to resemble those of modern days.The first was warm global temperatures, which prevented large volumes of water from being sequestered on land in the form of ice sheets.The second was related to accelerated seafloor spreading; the attendant enlargement of ocean ridges displaced enormous amounts of ocean water onto the landmasses.Some scientists have suggested that both of these large igneous events may have injected significant amounts of carbon dioxide and aerosols into the atmosphere, triggering a change in global climate.

The timing of these volcanic events appears to overlap the Triassic-Jurassic and Cretaceous-Tertiary, or Cretaceous-Paleogene, mass extinctions, and they may have played a role in them.

During this era the continents began to move into their present-day configurations.

A distinct modernization of life-forms occurred, partly because of the demise of many earlier types of organisms.

Three of the five largest mass extinctions in Earth history are associated with the Mesozoic: a mass extinction occurred at the boundary between the Mesozoic and the preceding Paleozoic; another occurred within the Mesozoic at the end of the Triassic Period; and a third occurred at the boundary between the Mesozoic and subsequent Cenozoic, resulting in the demise of the dinosaurs.rifting during the Late Triassic.

This separated Pangea into the continents of Laurasia and Gondwana.

Despite such a massive volume of basaltic material extruded, volcanic activity was probably short-lived, spanning only a few million years.