Dating 1970s fender stratocaster bridge parts

The early '80s 'JV Series' Squier Strats were undeniably amazing value for money, representing as they did the premium Fender Japan product in Europe, at a budget price.

The only reason collectors want the ‘spaghetti’ logo Squiers is that there were far, far fewer of them.In October ’82, Fender launched a range of Squier-branded Strats for the Japanese market. The Japanese domestic Squier reissues (still part of the JV series) did not have American pickups like the exports, and were vastly cheaper than the most expensive of the Japanese domestic Fender branded JVs.Very similar to an American vintage reissue but with ‘Made in Japan’ beneath the Fender logo, next to a slightly chunkier version of the ‘With Synchronized Tremolo’ lettering.On the early JV Strats, the ‘spaghetti’ logo was also a little fatter than on the later export MIJs.Equivalent '57 Reissues can be found via this link.

You can also find a detailed look at the Squier Japan Silver Series Strats of the early to mid '90s via this link. So, most guitarists know that Squier was a sub-brand of the Fender company, originally made solely in Japan, but later – forward from 1987 in fact – made in a variety of other countries.

The range-topping ST’57-115 1957 reissue, for instance, cost Y115,000 in Japan, whereas the SST-45 1957 reissue cost only Y45,000.

One ’57 reissue sold at more than two and a half times the price of the other, and there were other ’57 reissues in between too!

That’s everything, by the way – not just the Strats.

So the number of remaining JV Squier Strats with a Fender ‘spaghetti’ logo and ‘Squier series’ denotation on the headstock is bound to be pretty small – minimally so if you’re looking for one in good condition.

THE PREMIUM OUTPUT The first Strats made in Japan by Fender were vintage reissue ’57 and ’62 replicas, launched in Tokyo on Friday 7th May 1982.